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A “LIT” LOOK AT DISNEY’S HAUNTED MANSION: THE SKELETON IN THE COFFIN

17 Oct

A shot of the coffin scene in Disneyland’s Haunted Mansion. Photo by Dave DeCaro and used with permission; if you’re a Disney Park fan, you won’t want to miss his site! http://www.davelandweb.com/

If you love classic ghost stories, Disney’s Haunted Mansion offers more than thrills and chills. This four-part series takes a look at classic ghost story images the attraction brings to life.

You’ve just boarded your Doombuggy at Disneyland’sHauntedMansion, and it isn’t long before you come upon a room full of decaying funeral flowers. In the center, on a pedestal, is a rattling, thumping coffin. A pair of skeletal hands are desperately trying to loose the coffin’s lid, and if you listen closely, you hear: “Let me outta here! Please! Le-let me outta here!”

While the dead rising from graves is pretty common in the horror story canon, the specific image of a skeleton rattling his coffin lid is an allusion to Edgar Allan Poe’s story “The Premature Burial.”

For those who haven’t read the short story but have seen any of its film or television adaptations, the tale’s storyline is different. The story opens with several accounts of premature burials—most likely inspired by newspaper articles of the day. Consider these notes by Stephen Peithman in The Annotated Tales of Edgar Allan Poe:

“While rather farfetched today, premature burial did occur occasionally in Poe’s day, although not to the extent one would think after reading his tales on the subject. Some instances are recorded in George Alfred Walker’s Gatherings from Grave Yards (1839)…apparently due to a lack of sophisticated medical equipment. In order to avoid this problem, a “life-preserving coffin” was invented in 1843, mentioned by N.P. Willis in the New Mirror of November 18, so constructed as to give the victim air and a means to signal to those above ground that he was alive.[1]

Commentary on Poe’s description of aBaltimoreincident:

“A similar story appears in the Lancaster(Pennsylvania) Democrat December 5, 1845.”[2]

Commentary on Poe’s description of the unfortunate story of a wealthy young girl:

“Poe’s source here may be a story in the PhiladelphiaCasket, September 1827, entitled “The Lady Buried Alive,” which in turn admits to borrowing from two older stories…As for the names, they are all Poe’s invention, as is the date.”[3]

Whether Poe’s piece was based on real incidents or not, it’s reasonable to think that the terrified skeleton clawing to escape his coffin may have been inspired by a few passages in his “The Premature Burial.” One of the reports Poe presents contains direct reference to a skeleton:

“…how fearful a shock awaited the husband, who, personally, threw open the door. As its portals swung outwardly back, some white-apparelled object fell rattling within his arms. It was the skeleton of his wife in her yet unmoulded shroud.”[4]

And here are references to struggles within coffins:

“…that her struggles within the coffin had caused it to fall from a ledge, or shelf, to the floor, where it was so broken as to permit her escape.”[5]

“On the Sunday following, the grounds of the cemetery were, as usual, much thronged with visiters[6]; and, about noon, an intense excitement was created by the declaration of a peasant, that, while sitting upon the grave of the officer, he had distinctly felt a commotion of the earth, as if occasioned by some one struggling beneath…Spades were hurriedly procured, and the grave, which was shamefully shallow, was, in a few minutes, so far thrown open that the head of its occupant appeared. He was then, seemingly, dead; but he sat nearly erect within his coffin, the lid of which, in his furious struggles, he had partially uplifted.”[7]

If you’d like to read “The Premature Burial,” you can for free here: http://www.eapoe.org/works/tales/preburc.htm. If you’d like to own a copy in print, you can get it as part of his complete works here: http://amzn.com/0385074077. If you’d like it for your Kindle, it’s available here: http://amzn.com/B002LIT0F0.


[1] Edgar Allan Poe, “The Premature Burial,” in The Annotated Tales of Edgar Allan Poe, ed. Stephen Peithman (New York: Avenel Books, 1986), 149.

[2] Ibid., 151. It is, however, interesting to note here that the very first published appearance of “The Premature Burial” that included the passage was in 1844, so obviously, Poe wrote the story long before this newspaper article appeared.

[3] Ibid., 151

[4] Ibid., 151

[5] Ibid., 151

[6] This is how it is spelled in the original text.

[7] Ibid., 153

JOIN ME AND THE NEW ENGLAND HORROR WRITERS AT ROCK & SHOCK THIS WEEKEND!

12 Oct

It’s here! Rock & Shock blasts its way intoWorcester, Mass. this weekend at the DCU Center & the Palladium!

Rock and Shock is a fan convention and features celebrities, movies, vendors, and Q&A panels as well as musical concerts. This year’s celebrity guest list is extensive and includes Ace Frehley and Lance Henriksen.

I’ll be at the New England Horror Writers table along with other members including Stacey Longo Harris, Scott Goudsward (Shadows Over New England, Shadows Over Florida), David North-Martino, Larissa Glasser, T.J. May, Tracy Carbone (The Man of Mystery Hill), John McIlveen, and others, (I don’t have a list of who’s going yet, but when I know, I’ll update you), so be sure to stop by! We’ll have books for sale, you can talk one on one with any of us, and we’ll have plenty of cool swag, too!

For complete list of guests, schedules, and just about everything you could possibly want to know, check it out here: http://www.rockandshock.com/

Want to know more about the NEHW? Visit us at www.newenglandhorror.org.

PICS AND VIDS OF THE “WHY GHOSTS LOVE ME” FUNDRAISER!

11 Oct

 

 

Thank you JENNIFER STRICKLER COLE for this great shot! Left to right, Jennifer, Stacey Longo Harris, Kristi Petersen Schoonover, and Jayne Mackel.

Why Ghosts Love Me at St. Peter’s Masonic Lodge #21 inNew Milford,Connecticut was a huge success!

Nathan Schoonover of A&E’s Extreme Paranormal, Travel Channel’s Paranormal Challenge and The Ghostman & Demon Hunter Show was on hand for spooky stories and Halloween fun. The presentation included ghostly stories and paranormal evidence with guest speakers Nicole Hall and Angel Ortiz of Connecticut Soul Seekers, Terri J Garofalo of Entities-R-Us—ghost hunting comics—Donna Parish-Bischoff of Indy Paranormal and Frank Todaro of The Invisible World Radio. I was there signing copies of my book, Skeletons in the Swimmin’ Hole—Tales from Haunted Disney World, and was joined by fellow horror short fiction writer Stacey Longo, also of New England Horror Writers Association.

Proceeds from all sales and admission went toward the upkeep of the historical St. Peter’s Lodge.

If you’d like to see photos and video from this great event, head on over to the Kristi Petersen Schoonover website here: http://wp.me/pIXRs-12f

A “LIT” LOOK AT DISNEY’S HAUNTED MANSION: THE ATTIC’S PORTRAIT

10 Oct

A shot of the Bride’s portrait in the attic scene in Disneyland’s Haunted Mansion, taken in May, 2008. Photo by Dave DeCaro and used with permission; if you’re a Disney Park fan, you won’t want to miss his site! http://www.davelandweb.com/

If you love classic ghost stories, Disney’s Haunted Mansion offers more than thrills and chills. This four-part series takes a look at classic ghost story images the attraction brings to life.

Your Doombuggy rounds the corner and enters the Mansion’s attic, a creepy menagerie of web-shrouded trunks, lamps, furniture and dishes. The deeper you go, the more dense and specific the items become—you see fine china, a rotting wedding cake, an embroidered wedding announcement…and then a ghostly bride.

There have been so many changes in that scene in the last few years, and not just to the bride herself. The last time I traversed the forbidden attic was in 2008, and I noticed for the first time that at least one portrait—that of the bride with one of her husbands—is in an oval frame.

One of the Edgar Allan Poe’s freakiest little pieces isn’t the one that’s read as part of school curriculums or even the most talked about. If you’ve been reading my blog for awhile, then you know what that piece is, because I’ve referenced it several times: “The Oval Portrait.”

While it’s true that oval frames for portraits were quite common during the Victorian age, the bride’s portrait at its very core seems to have been inspired by Poe’s short piece.

*POE’S “THE OVAL PORTRAIT” SPOILER ALERT*

٭ Poe’s “Oval Portrait” is a story within a story: it opens with the narrator and his valet stumbling into an abandoned mansion for shelter. In theHauntedMansionattraction, we play the role of the narrator: we have “stumbled” into a decrepit, abandoned (well, by LIVE people, anyway) mansion. 

٭ The narrator and his valet choose to settle

“in one of the smallest and least-sumptuously furnished apartments. It lay in a remote turret of the building. Its decorations were rich, yet tattered and antique…”[1]

A turret could certainly be comparable to an attic—high and tucked away—and notice that the turret’s furnishings could easily describe what’s in theHauntedMansion’s attic.

٭ The comparison between the frames in “The Oval Portrait” and the Haunted Mansion is also worthy of note. “The Oval Portrait”’s frame is described as “richly gilded and filigreed in Moresque.”[2] Another term for Moresque is Arabesque, which is a type of symmetrical scrolling (usually consisting of some kind of foliage). Take a closer look at the photo above. Note that the Haunted Mansion’s frame appears, although worn a bit, gilded—and that the silver scrolling on the top and bottom appears to be symmetrical: Arabesque (Moresque). The word “arabesque,” in addition, is used higher up in “The Oval Portrait”: “frames of rich golden arabesque.”[3] So there may have been some consideration of this story here when the Imagineers were choosing the frame.

٭ Both portraits are stunningly life-like. While we Disney fans would normally attribute that to the Imagineers’ insistence on quality, this fact is a key plot point in Poe’s piece (which was originally titled “Life in Death,” by the way): The narrator is so captivated by it he is drawn to learn more about the work:

“Least of all, could it have been that my fancy, shaken from its half slumber, had mistaken the head for that of a living person…I had found the spell of the picture in an absolute life-likeliness of expression, which, at first startling, finally confounded, subdued and appalled me. With deep and reverent awe I replaced the candelabrum in its former position…I sought eagerly the volume which discussed the paintings and their histories. Turning to the number which designated the oval portrait, I there read the vague and quaint words which follow…”[4]

٭ Lastly, the tragic tale “The Oval Portrait”’s narrator reads in the volume is that of a young bride—and it ends in death. 

If you’d like to read Poe’s “The Oval Portrait”—a later version in which he removed some extraneous details about opium use—you can read it for free here: http://www.eapoe.org/works/tales/ovlprtb.htm (if you want to read the original 1842 version which includes the whole introductory paragraph at the beginning, you can do that here, although most published versions of this story never include it: http://www.eapoe.org/works/tales/ovlprta.htm). If you’d prefer to own it for your library, you can find it in The Complete Stories and Poems of Edgar Allan Poe here: http://amzn.com/0385074077. You can also get just the story “The Oval Portrait” for your Kindle here: http://amzn.com/B005EC3KI8; or, if you prefer to own his complete works for your Kindle, you can buy that here: http://amzn.com/B0038M2IMK.


[1] Edgar Allan Poe, “The Oval Portrait,” in The Annotated Tales of Edgar Allan Poe, ed. Stephen Peithman (New York: Avenel Books, 1986), 110.

[2] Ibid., 111

[3] Ibid., 110

[4] Ibid., 111-112

I’LL BE AT THE OPEN AIR MARKET & FESTIVAL IN MIDDLETOWN WITH NEHW ASSOCIATION SUNDAY, OCT. 23

9 Oct

A far shot of the Open Air Market and Festival at the Wadsworth Mansion in Middletown, CT. Photo Credit: Mel Tavares, Rocky Hill (CT) Patch ~ http://rockyhill.patch.com/users/mel-tavares

I’ll be at the 9th Annual Open Air Market and Festival at Wadsworth Mansion Sunday, October 23, 2011, from 9 a.m. – 4 p.m., signing books and socializing with New England Horror Writers Association members Stacey Longo, Rob Watts, Kasey Shoemaker, and Dan Foley. Don’t miss your chance to pick up some signed spooky reads for Halloween!

The event will featureConnecticutgrown or made products, entertainment throughout the day, horse-drawn carriage rides, face painting, and docent-lead tours of the mansion (which I hope I get the opportunity to do!). It’s held at Wadsworth Mansion at Long Hill Estate, 421 Wadsworth Street, Middletown, CT06457.

For more information, you can check out this article on Patch: http://rockyhill.patch.com/events/9th-annual-open-air-market-at-wadsworth-mansion-in-middletown or visit http://www.wadsworthmansion.com/

Hope to see you there!

LOOKING TO SPOOK YOUR SATURDAY? TONIGHT: WHY GHOSTS LOVE ME!

8 Oct

TONIGHT: Why Ghosts Love Me at 7 p.m. at St. Peter’s Masonic Lodge #21 inNew Milford,Connecticut!

Join me and host Nathan Schoonover of A&E’s Extreme Paranormal, Travel Channel’s Paranormal Challenge and The Ghostman & Demon Hunter Show for spooky stories and Halloween fun.

The presentation will include ghostly stories and paranormal evidence with guest speakers Nicole Hall and Angel Ortiz of Connecticut Soul Seekers, Terri J Garofalo of Entities-R-Us, Donna Parish-Bischoff of Indy Paranormal and Frank Todaro of The Invisible World Radio. Kristi will be there signing copies of her book, Skeletons in the Swimmin’ Hole—Tales from Haunted Disney World, and selling some other goodies. Refreshments will also be available.

Proceeds from all sales and admission will go toward upkeep of the historical St. Peter’s Lodge in New Milford,Connecticut.

The event takes place from 7 p.m. – 10 p.m. Saturday, October 8, at St. Peter’s Lodge #21 at11 Aspetuck Avenue in New Milford, CT. Tickets sold at the door. Last year’s event sold out, so get there early! Admission: Adults $10, Seniors $8, and Kids 10 and Under, $7. 

ROCK & SHOCK IS COMING…JOIN ME AND THE NEW ENGLAND HORROR WRITERS OCTOBER 14-16!

5 Oct

There’s probably not much that Robert Englund (best known for A Nightmare on Elm Street) and I have in common except for V in the 1980s (he was in it and I loved it)—and that we’ll both be at the same event in October: ROCK AND SHOCK, from October 14-16 at the DCU Center & the Palladium in Worcester, Mass.

Rock and Shock is a fan convention and features celebrities, movies, vendors, and Q&A panels as well as musical concerts. This year’s celebrity guest list is extensive and includes Ace Frehley and Lance Henriksen.

I’ll be at the New England Horror Writers table along with other members including Stacey Longo Harris, Scott Goudsward (Shadows Over New England, Shadows Over Florida), David North-Martino, Larissa Glasser, T.J. May, Tracy Carbone (The Man of Mystery Hill), John McIlveen, and others, (I don’t have a list of who’s going yet, but when I know, I’ll update you), so be sure to stop by!

For complete list of guests, schedules, and just about everything you could possibly want to know, check it out here: http://www.rockandshock.com/

 

PHOTOS AND VIDEOS FROM NEW ENGLAND HORROR WRITERS AT THE HEBRON HARVEST FAIR

4 Oct

Copies of Skeletons in the Swimmin' Hole--Tales from Haunted Disney World in the New England Horror Writers Association Booth at the Hebron Harvest Fair.

I had a great time with the New England Horror Writers’ at the Hebron Harvest Fair! You can catch photos and videos here:  http://wp.me/pIXRs-105

WRITER STACEY LONGO JOINING ME AT THIS WEEKEND’S WHY GHOSTS LOVE ME EVENT TO BENEFIT MASONIC LODGE

4 Oct

Me and horror writer Stacey Longo at the recent Hebron Harvest Fair in Hebron, CT.

I’m thrilled to announce that fellow horror writer Stacey Longo will be joining me this weekend at the Why Ghosts Love Me Halloween event to benefit St. Peter’s Masonic Lodge in New Milford, CT. She will be there selling copies of the various anthologies that have included her hair-raising tales, and I, of course, will be there with Skeletons in the Swimmin’ Hole—Tales from Haunted Disney World as well as a few other goodies.

Stacey’s work has been featured in several anthologies to include Dark Things IV, Malicious Deviance, Daily Bites of Flesh 2011, and Hell Hath No Fury, and several are forthcoming. You can read more about her at http://www.staceylongo.com/.

Don’t miss out! This is your chance to get some great spooky reading for a terrific cause. And now, some information on the event itself:

Join host Nathan Schoonover of A&E’s Extreme Paranormal, Travel Channel’s Paranormal Challenge and The Ghostman & Demon Hunter Show for spooky stories and Halloween fun.

The presentation will include ghostly stories and paranormal evidence with guest speakers Nicole Hall and Angel Ortiz of Connecticut Soul Seekers, Terri J Garofalo of Entities-R-Us, Donna Parish-Bischoff of Indy Paranormal and Frank Todaro of The Invisible World Radio. Kristi will be there signing copies of her book, Skeletons in the Swimmin’ Hole—Tales from Haunted Disney World, and selling some other goodies. Refreshments will also be available.

Proceeds from all sales and admission will go toward upkeep of the historical St. Peter’s Lodge inNew Milford,Connecticut.

The event takes place from 7 p.m. – 10 p.m. Saturday, October 8, at St. Peter’s Lodge #21 at11 Aspetuck AvenueinNew Milford, CT. Tickets sold at the door. Last year’s event sold out, so get there early! Admission: Adults $10, Seniors $8, and Kids 10 and Under, $7.

 

A “LIT” LOOK AT DISNEY’S HAUNTED MANSION: THE CEMETERY’S CARETAKER & DOG

3 Oct

 

A shot of the Caretaker and Dog in the graveyard scene in Disneyland’s Haunted Mansion. Photo by Dave DeCaro and used with permission; if you’re a Disney Park fan, you won’t want to miss his site! http://www.davelandweb.com/

If you love classic ghost stories, Disney’s Haunted Mansion offers more than thrills and chills. This four-part series takes a look at classic ghost story images the attraction brings to life.

As your Doombuggy leaves the attic and descends into the cemetery, a look to your left reveals a terrified shovel-bearing caretaker and a quaking, half-starved dog. While there are probably many references in classic ghost stories to cemetery caretakers and dogs, this image reminds me of the scene at the conclusion of Robert Louis Stevenson’s 1881 classic “The Body-Snatcher.”

In the tale’s final scene, a pair of medical students who make a little cash providing bodies for dissection head out to a gated rural cemetery with lanterns and shovels:

“It was by this time growing somewhat late. The gig, according to order, was brought round to the door with both lamps brightly shining, and the young men had to pay their bill and take the road. They announced that they were bound for Peebles, and drove in that direction till they were clear of the last houses of the town; then, extinguishing the lamps, returned upon their course, and followed a by-road toward Glencorse. There was no sound but that of their own passage, and the incessant, strident pouring of the rain. It was pitch dark; here and there a white gate or a white stone in the wall guided them for a short space across the night; but for the most part it was at a foot pace, and almost groping, that they picked their way through that resonant blackness to their solemn and isolated destination. In the sunken woods that traverse the neighbourhood of the burying-ground the last glimmer failed them, and it became necessary to kindle a match and reillumine one of the lanterns of the gig. Thus, under the dripping trees, and environed by huge and moving shadows, they reached the scene of their unhallowed labours.

They were both experienced in such affairs, and powerful with the spade…”[1]

Then, as the pair rides back in the carriage with their baggage between them,

“All over the countryside, and from every degree of distance, the farm dogs accompanied their passage with tragic ululations; and it grew and grew upon his mind that some unnatural miracle had been accomplished, that some nameless change had befallen the dead body, and that it was in fear of their unholy burden that the dogs were howling.”[2]

The set, the lantern, the shovel, the darkness, and the woeful dog…Disney’s vignette has all the elements of “The Body-Snatcher”’s final scene.

Don’t worry, I didn’t ruin the story’s ending. If you’d like to read Robert Louis Stevenson’s “The Body-Snatcher,” you can read it for free here (note—this text is complete; some places that have posted it around the web have omitted a few paragraphs toward the end of the piece. This site also has an interesting introduction about the story’s publishing history): http://gaslight.mtroyal.ca/body.htm

If you’d prefer to own it for your library, you can purchase a copy in print here: http://amzn.com/1420932071…or for your Kindle here: http://amzn.com/B0038YWJX6


[1] Robert Louis Stevenson, “The Body-Snatcher,” in The Complete Short Stories of Robert Louis Stevenson, ed. Charles Neider (Cambridge: Da Capo Press, Inc., 1998), 438.

[2] Ibid, 440.

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